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Around 1700 people are diagnosed with brain cancer in Australia annually and approximately 1200 die from the disease every year. Brain cancer kills more children in Australia than any other disease and more people under 40 than any other cancer.

Around 1700 people are diagnosed with brain cancer in Australia annually and approximately 1200 die from the disease every year. Brain cancer kills more children in Australia than any other disease and more people under 40 than any other cancer.

Brain cancer is a mass of unnecessary and abnormal cells growing in the brain, also known as a brain tumour. 

 

There are two basic kinds of brain tumours – primary brain tumours and metastatic brain tumours. A tumour that starts in the brain is a primary brain tumour. Metastatic brain tumours begin as cancer somewhere else in the body then spread to the brain.

 

Brain tumours can be benign or malignant. Brain cancer is a malignant kind of tumour. 

Brain cancer is a mass of unnecessary and abnormal cells growing in the brain, also known as a brain tumour. 

 

There are two basic kinds of brain tumours – primary brain tumours and metastatic brain tumours. A tumour that starts in the brain is a primary brain tumour. Metastatic brain tumours begin as cancer somewhere else in the body then spread to the brain.

 

Brain tumours can be benign or malignant. Brain cancer is a malignant kind of tumour. 

Benign tumours are not considered to be cancerous. For benign tumours, standard treatment, like surgery, is often effective. However, because the brain is enclosed in the skull, even benign tumours can be dangerous. The skull can’t expand to make room for a growing tumour, so the tumour may press on, or damage delicate brain tissue, sometimes becoming life-threatening. Common benign brain tumours include meningiomas and pituitary tumours.

 

Malignant brain tumours vary widely, both in the way they grow and the way they respond to treatment. Some are neatly contained within a capsule (encapsulated) and are relatively easy to remove. Others have long, thin filaments spreading throughout the brain, like the roots of a plant. Common malignant brain tumours include astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and glioblastomas

Benign tumours are not considered to be cancerous. For benign tumours, standard treatment, like surgery, is often effective. However, because the brain is enclosed in the skull, even benign tumours can be dangerous. The skull can’t expand to make room for a growing tumour, so the tumour may press on, or damage delicate brain tissue, sometimes becoming life-threatening. Common benign brain tumours include meningiomas and pituitary tumours.

 

Malignant brain tumours vary widely, both in the way they grow and the way they respond to treatment. Some are neatly contained within a capsule (encapsulated) and are relatively easy to remove. Others have long, thin filaments spreading throughout the brain, like the roots of a plant. Common malignant brain tumours include astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and glioblastomas

iconBenign Tumours

Benign tumours are not considered to be cancerous. For benign tumours, standard treatment, like surgery, is often effective. However, because the brain is enclosed in the skull, even benign tumours can be dangerous. The skull cannot expand to make room for a growing tumour, so the tumour may press on, or damage delicate brain tissue, sometimes becoming life-threatening. Common benign brain tumours include meningiomas and pituitary tumours.

iconMalignant Tumours

Malignant brain tumours vary widely, both in the way they grow and the way they respond to treatment. Some are neatly contained within a capsule (encapsulated) and are relatively easy to remove. Others have long, thin filaments spreading throughout the brain, like the roots of a plant. Common malignant brain tumours include astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and glioblastomas.

iconBenign Tumours

Benign tumours are not considered to be cancerous. For benign tumours, standard treatment, like surgery, is often effective. However, because the brain is enclosed in the skull, even benign tumours can be dangerous. The skull cannot expand to make room for a growing tumour, so the tumour may press on, or damage delicate brain tissue, sometimes becoming life-threatening. Common benign brain tumours include meningiomas and pituitary tumours.

iconMalignant Tumours

Malignant brain tumours vary widely, both in the way they grow and the way they respond to treatment. Some are neatly contained within a capsule (encapsulated) and are relatively easy to remove. Others have long, thin filaments spreading throughout the brain, like the roots of a plant. Common malignant brain tumours include astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and glioblastomas.

Brain cancers in children are different from those in adults. Children's’ bodies and brains are still developing. Their tumours are different too. Childhood tumours frequently appear in distinct locations and behave differently when compared to brain tumours in adults. 

 

In 2016, the World Health Organisation announced an updated system to classify the brain and central nervous system tumours. The new classification system integrates molecular information and classifies brain tumours by their cell origin and level of aggressiveness. You can read about the types of brain cancer here.

 

If you would like to find out more about brain cancer, here is a link to our 2018 literature review.

Brain cancers in children are different from those in adults. Children's’ bodies and brains are still developing. Their tumours are different too. Childhood tumours frequently appear in distinct locations and behave differently when compared to brain tumours in adults. 

 

In 2016, the World Health Organisation announced an updated system to classify the brain and central nervous system tumours. The new classification system integrates molecular information and classifies brain tumours by their cell origin and level of aggressiveness. You can read about the types of brain cancer here.

 

If you would like to find out more about brain cancer, here is a link to our 2018 literature review.

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Disclaimer: All content on Cure Brain Cancer Foundation website is created and published online for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. You should seek your own medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health professional.

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