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One of the first and steepest learning curves immediately post-diagnosis is to work out who everybody is. Your supportive care team can consist of medical professionals, administration coordinators and your family. It is important to also include your local GP as part of your support team, as they’ll often be your first port-of-call for referrals and direction. 

One of the first and steepest learning curves immediately post-diagnosis is to work out who everybody is. Your supportive care team can consist of medical professionals, administration coordinators and your family. It is important to also include your local GP as part of your support team, as they’ll often be your first port-of-call for referrals and direction. 

iconWhat's Next?

Sometimes just working out what to do first is the biggest challenge of all. Organising your appointments and identifying your support network can be two good places to start. Read More

iconReturn to Life

Understanding and managing your medications, all the way through to travelling, returning to work and driving can all play a part in returning to life. Read More

iconIntimacy

Your perception of yourself can change significantly after a brain cancer diagnosis, and often that can affect your physical relationships. Read More

iconFertility

As a young person’s cancer, brain cancer can affect young families who are hoping to expand. Read More

iconWhat's Next?

Sometimes just working out what to do first is the biggest challenge of all. Organising your appointments and identifying your support network can be two good places to start. Read More

iconReturn to Life

Understanding and managing your medications, all the way through to travelling, returning to work and driving can all play a part in returning to life. Read More

Who's Who?


 

A summary of the physicians and support workers who will support you post-diagnosis:

General Practitioner (GP) 

A good GP who knows you and your family can provide a useful touchstone throughout your treatment and beyond. They will provide your specialists with referrals and can also help with things like flu shots and symptom management. 

 

Neurosurgeon 

Your surgeon is the one who will deal with the cause: your tumour. Usually, a biopsy or brain surgery is one of the first steps you will take after diagnosis, so a surgeon may be one of the first people you see. 

 

Neurologist 

The neurologist will help you handle the symptoms. Things like seizures and headaches can be managed through medications. 

 

Radiologist 

The radiologist looks at your MRI scans and tells the rest of the team what is going on inside. The MRI scan can help your other doctors to see the behaviour of the tumour and plan a treatment regime. 

 

Radiation Oncologist 

If you are going to have radiation therapy, the radiation oncologist will be the one to prescribe your treatment. 

 

Radiotherapist 

The radiotherapists deliver radiation treatment to your tumour. This can be delivered in one or two treatments, or over a period of about 6 weeks. 

 

Neuro-Oncologist 

Your oncologist will monitor you over the course of your treatment and be responsible for prescribing chemotherapy, or immunotherapy treatments, and you may find them to be your main doctor in your treatment journey. 

 

Psychologist 

A psychologist will play a part in a range of areas and may provide anything from emotional support through talk therapy, through to assessing changes to cognition. 

 

Neuro Ophthalmologist 

This specialist will deal with changes to your vision that may occur as a result of your tumour and treatment. 

 

Nurses 

Nurses provide an excellent link back to your treating team, and you will find you come across them throughout your entire treatment journey. You may find you feel more comfortable approaching nurses and they can pass any issues you have on to your treating team. 

 

Rehabilitation Team 

Your rehabilitation team will handle aspects of return to life after treatment, particularly surgery. They’ll assess you physically and may even visit your home to see if there are any changes that need to be made. 

 

Epileptologist/Epilepsy Nurse 

If you are having trouble with seizures that cannot be managed through the typical routes, your specialist may refer you to an epileptologist to help find a way. 

 

Palliative Care Team 

Palliative care nurses are specialists in pain relief and helping you to maintain the highest quality of life that you can. 

 

Speech Therapist 

A speech therapist will assess how your speech has changed as a result of your tumour and treatment, and also provide solutions to help you. 

 

Dietician 

If you or your treating team are worried about nourishment, you may be referred to a dietician who can help you to maintain your weight, so you are in the best place possible to handle treatment and recovery. 

 

Occupational Therapist 

An Occupational Therapist (or OT) will help you to rebuild the skills you need to manage everyday life, everything from writing to getting dressed.  

 

Social Worker 

A social worker is your touchpoint for difficulties you may be facing in your return to life. Be it financial issues, home care needs or refers you on to other supports. 

 

Clinical Trial Coordinator 

If you are enrolled in a clinical trial, you may come across a clinical trial coordinator, who is the person organising the logistics behind running the clinical trial. 

 

Physiotherapist 

A physiotherapist will be the person who helps you in recovering your movement and strength after treatment. This may be in either an inpatient or an outpatient setting. 

 

Fertility Specialist 

If you are considering starting a family, you can ask to be referred to a fertility specialist to discuss your options.  

 

Sexologist 

If you are worried about having any intimacy issues as a result of the diagnosis or treatment, an intimacy specialist can work with you to overcome them. 

 

Who's Who?


 

A summary of the physicians and support workers who will support you post-diagnosis:

General Practitioner (GP) 

A good GP who knows you and your family can provide a useful touchstone throughout your treatment and beyond. They will provide your specialists with referrals and can also help with things like flu shots and symptom management. 

 

Neurosurgeon 

Your surgeon is the one who will deal with the cause: your tumour. Usually, a biopsy or brain surgery is one of the first steps you will take after diagnosis, so a surgeon may be one of the first people you see. 

 

Neurologist 

The neurologist will help you handle the symptoms. Things like seizures and headaches can be managed through medications. 

 

Radiologist 

The radiologist looks at your MRI scans and tells the rest of the team what is going on inside. The MRI scan can help your other doctors to see the behaviour of the tumour and plan a treatment regime. 

 

Radiation Oncologist 

If you are going to have radiation therapy, the radiation oncologist will be the one to prescribe your treatment. 

 

Radiotherapist 

The radiotherapists deliver radiation treatment to your tumour. This can be delivered in one or two treatments, or over a period of about 6 weeks. 

 

Neuro-Oncologist 

Your oncologist will monitor you over the course of your treatment and be responsible for prescribing chemotherapy, or immunotherapy treatments, and you may find them to be your main doctor in your treatment journey. 

 

Psychologist 

A psychologist will play a part in a range of areas and may provide anything from emotional support through talk therapy, through to assessing changes to cognition. 

 

Neuro Ophthalmologist 

This specialist will deal with changes to your vision that may occur as a result of your tumour and treatment. 

 

Nurses 

Nurses provide an excellent link back to your treating team, and you will find you come across them throughout your entire treatment journey. You may find you feel more comfortable approaching nurses and they can pass any issues you have on to your treating team. 

 

Rehabilitation Team 

Your rehabilitation team will handle aspects of return to life after treatment, particularly surgery. They’ll assess you physically and may even visit your home to see if there are any changes that need to be made. 

 

Epileptologist/Epilepsy Nurse 

If you are having trouble with seizures that cannot be managed through the typical routes, your specialist may refer you to an epileptologist to help find a way. 

 

Palliative Care Team 

Palliative care nurses are specialists in pain relief and helping you to maintain the highest quality of life that you can. 

 

Speech Therapist 

A speech therapist will assess how your speech has changed as a result of your tumour and treatment, and also provide solutions to help you. 

 

Dietician 

If you or your treating team are worried about nourishment, you may be referred to a dietician who can help you to maintain your weight, so you are in the best place possible to handle treatment and recovery. 

 

Occupational Therapist 

An Occupational Therapist (or OT) will help you to rebuild the skills you need to manage everyday life, everything from writing to getting dressed.  

 

Social Worker 

A social worker is your touchpoint for difficulties you may be facing in your return to life. Be it financial issues, home care needs or refers you on to other supports. 

 

Clinical Trial Coordinator 

If you are enrolled in a clinical trial, you may come across a clinical trial coordinator, who is the person organising the logistics behind running the clinical trial. 

 

Physiotherapist 

A physiotherapist will be the person who helps you in recovering your movement and strength after treatment. This may be in either an inpatient or an outpatient setting. 

 

Fertility Specialist 

If you are considering starting a family, you can ask to be referred to a fertility specialist to discuss your options.  

 

Sexologist 

If you are worried about having any intimacy issues as a result of the diagnosis or treatment, an intimacy specialist can work with you to overcome them. 

 

Disclaimer: All content on Cure Brain Cancer Foundation website is created and published online for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. You should seek your own medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health professional.

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